Thursday, August 30, 2012

A 'Lazy Cook' at home

Today is my last day in the office. Tomorrow starts vacation, and I can't wait to attempt to do nothing. Today will be a busy day at work: tying up loose ends, filing things, readying my desk for my return on September 10 and setting my "Out of Office" assistant to reply ALL: "I'm gone, contact someone else." I love that. (Of course I'm leaving a more professional note than that!)

Last night I cooked "The Lazy Cook's Supper." It's a recipe my husband and I acquired from his grandfather. You basically slice onions, break up ground beef, layer tomatoes and zucchini, sprinkle Italian seasonings like oregano, thyme and rosemary, and dab on a little Parmesan cheese--throw all of these ingredients in a heavy-bottomed skillet or frying pan and put the lid on. Set the stove at medium heat and let the pot steam and cook for 45 minutes. That's it. You can serve the meal over rice, corn bread, toast, or just eat it as is. That's what we did. Here's a snapshot of the original recipe.



Lately I've been trying to spend more time at home. I'm the type of person that feels satisfied running around and doing things I probably would rather not do. That's strange, I know. But it feels normal, to me, when I'm busy. Even busy with things I'm not entirely into. What I'm working on, as a newlywed (eloped in June 2012), is saying NO to other people and saying YES to my husband. I'm understanding that it's ok to STOP and smell the roses or in my case STOP and watch a really bad episode of the Real Housewives of New Jersey or my latest fav, Here Comes Honey Boo Boo.



The recipe might be called "The Lazy Cook's Supper," but cooking is never lazy to me. I enjoy cooking; it's a challenge for me. I try to cook or bake something at least once a week. It's true, too, practice does make perfect. You get better as you make more meals. I was always impressed with my Mom and her cooking skills. The way she could remember the ingredients and steps for her famous macaroni and cheese, among other dishes. I get it now, though, the more you cook, the more you just KNOW what goes where and what temperature works when. Cooking is an art and something that helps me stay home, stay relaxed, and stay in the moment.

Until next time.